For Valentine’s Day, I’mma love myself.

Recently, I’ve been terrified I was failing everything in life. I’ve felt behind, buried beneath, and bassackwards.

Turns out, I have been failing spectacularly.

I’ve been failing myself.

I have been my own worst enemy, afraid of my body. I had a resurgence of sexiness last year, but it dwindled by the end of the year and vanished completely in the last two months or so. I’ve become afraid it would drive those I love away, as it felt like it had in the past. It doesn’t help that two partners in my life have told me that they were no longer sexually attracted to my body because of it’s size. The first time it happened was devastating. The combination of derision in that partners’ eyes, along with the words that shot from their mouth was something I’ve spent years battling. The second time it happened made my heart sink but I also was able to hold my head up and have a discussion about it. There were tears. A lot of tears. I went for a drive. Had a conversation with a dear friend who reminded me to love myself, first and foremost.

Then I also remembered a scene recently where I was petrified to take off my clothing. I was not ordered to. In fact, Sir told me to get down to the lowest form of undress that I felt comfortable with. But with another wonderful person’s help, I got to the point where I thought, “was I really going to protect myself by keeping my pants and bra on? And if my body was going to drive him away, wouldn’t I want to know that now? And why would I want to be with someone like that anyway?” Something stronger than my fear told me I could trust the situation, Sir, and the scene.

So, I stripped to my panties and got to my knees where I belonged.

The scene was amazing and brought me places I haven’t been in years. During aftercare, though, my brain kicked in again and I got scared. Sir made me talk through the shit my brain was telling me and the conversation we had went something like this:

Me: I’m not good enough.
Sir: Wrong.
Me: I’m not pretty enough.
Sir: Wrong.
Me: I’m not submissive enough.
Sir: Very wrong.
Me: I’m too fucked up for you.
Sir: *laughter* Nope.
Me: I’m too old.
Sir: Nope.

By the end of that conversation, I felt more centered and safe again. Later, though, it kept banging around in my head. Apparently, it didn’t fully resonate until I was able to internalize and believe the answers myself. It’s a daily fight to believe it. But I’m prepared to fight. I posted a pic about three weeks ago from a scene back in November at GKE: Classic. It’s taken me over two months to post it because of body image issues.

Also, I started writing this post three weeks ago when I posted that pic and it’s taken three revisions to finally not be afraid posting it.

For some reason, it’s easy for me to see that my friends and partners and metamours are gorgeous and glorious, regardless (or maybe because) of their color, size, gender presentation, hairness, religion or lack thereof, mental health issues, neural diversity, etc. I think variety is good, healthy, necessary. One of my favorite quotes is still from Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves:

“Allah loves wondrous variety.”

If this is the case, why is it so fucking hard to apply this to myself? Especially since I’m poly and have multiple partners? One would think that that would be enough to correct my brain, like, “hey, you’ve got multiple partners of different types. Why you no think you pretty?”

Because it goes beyond beauty. Because it’s also sexiness. And sex. I mean, society in general still has a fucking hard time being okay with the fact that not just young, thin, straight, white cis people fuck. Old people do. Fat people do. People of all ethnicities and genders and all kinds of people do (except some ace spectrum people…I see you, too…technically am still one of you to a certain extent.).

And I’ve had a really, really hard time admitting that/when I want attention. That elusive feeling of being desired. When it starts coming up, I hide. Retreat. Say I don’t need anything. The few times makeout sessions happened recently in the last few months have been stupid fucking difficult for me because I don’t think that the other person really wanted it to happen, even with what seemed like enthusiastic consent. It kind of impedes things, especially that being desired thing, if I don’t believe or trust that the person on the other end actually desires me when they are actively showing me that they do.

See, as a submissive, I’ve always loved to please those I care for, both in nonsexual and sexual service (for those with whom I have that type of relationship). It means I tend to initiate things in established relationships. Or used to. And back when I identified as a lesbian a million years ago, I thought I was a stone butch. I’m currently pansexual, and realizing that it wasn’t so much that I solely preferred to please my partner and not have it reciprocated so much as, at some point, I got scared to accept attention, especially in the sexual sphere. I have a hard time believing and trusting anyone could be attracted to me. I tend to need to be hit with a clue by four before I’ll even consider that someone could be sexually interested in me.

That one partners’ eyes come back to me and I’m thrown back, suddenly thinking, feeling this new person is going to wind up looking at me the same way, if they weren’t already. That my body is too big, my breasts are too weirdly small, and my double chin was eventually, if not right now, going to make them sneer at me. And even when I get past all this self-berating talk and difficulty from the past, I may or may not spend awhile asking if it’s real. And even then I may or may not spend a little longer thinking, “sure, okay. You like me now. But when is the other shoe gonna drop? When is the love in your eyes going to turn to disgust?” Might as well beat them to the punch, right? Tear myself down before anyone else can?

What? That’s served me ever so well.

*sigh*

Yeah, I don’t believe me either.

What I’m realizing is that I’ve spent so much time drawing my sense of value, worth, and sexiness based on what other people thought of me. In the relationship with the partner who chose an incredibly hurtful way to tell me they weren’t attracted to me anymore and why, sex had been falling off gradually and I felt like I had to beg (not in the good way) for any attention or interaction. That takes a toll. I think I kind of gave up. Decided I wasn’t worth it.

It took reading a post on Fet to make me understand how desperately I’d wanted someone(s) to be demonstratively, publicly proud of me so I could use it to try to constantly fight the feeling that anyone with me must be secretly ashamed of me and eventually going to leave me for someone younger and thinner and better.  That I’ve craved public displays of affection and dominance because my own self esteem says if it’s not happening, they don’t want it to happen because there’s something wrong with me. That I have a hard time talking about sex because I’m certain if it’s not happening or hasn’t happened in a long time, my body must be what’s wrong. And if it hasn’t happened yet, it’s clearly because they don’t want me. Not any number of other reasons, including, as I’ve recently been hit over the head with, hey…other people have fears and insecurities, too, and they may not want to push me or be sure that I’m attracted to them. These are not easy things to admit. But it’s not fair to try to use someone else to be a buffer or balm to things I have to deal with in myself.

So! I’ve recently tossed all those negative fucks out the window. I’mma love myself first.  I’m not going to draw my self worth from what someone else thinks of me. Or, I’m gonna endeavor not to. It is still a journey. My plan is to seek out people who want to explore and have fun with me and we’ll figure out what that means and what we do as we go along by talking directly to each other. It’ll be different with each person because we’re all unique people. I’m going to stop being my own worst goddamned enemy and running scared before I even get close to someone so they can’t hurt me first. I will hold my head up and rediscover my own fucking fuckableness.

Happy Valentine’s Day, y’all. No matter who you’re with or not with or what kind of relationship style you’re in, may you find a center of love in yourself for yourself. As for me, life is kind enough to line up with these epiphanies I’ve been having and I’m spending Valentine’s Day night having dinner with a dear friend and picking up a vanity she’s giving me. If that’s not a message, I don’t know what is.

Relationship Evolution; or, I did not always poly like this.

Recently, I’ve been having a LOT of conversation about poly structure. With friends, with partners, with metamours. The title of this post was actually going to be a quote from one of those conversations, when talking about the oft-taboo subject of (dun, dun DUUUNNNNN) Veto Power. Currently, I have the philosophy and have expressed to my partners that there are only two situations where I feel Veto Power is appropriate and acceptable.

1. When the metamour is clearly abusive. This can be tricky because I’m not dating nor am I friends with any educationally certified people who can make this call. (If I am, I’m forgetting. Please remind me.) So it becomes a “this feels really fucked up and I don’t like it can we please talk about this” situation.

2. When the metamour is doing illegal things. Like, is clearly a criminal and influencing or involving your partner in those things. I’m not talking the kink line and WIIWD, but things like robbery. Or, hey. You’re dating the unabomber…stop that. (<- what the title of this post almost was.)

Otherwise…I don’t want to tell my partners what they can and can’t do with their bodies and hearts and I sure as fuck don’t want them telling me what I can and can’t do with mine. I make it clear that I like communication. Is there someone new on the horizon? Great! Lemme know. But then…that gets tricky.

What is “on the horizon”? I’ve run into this with a partner or two. What’s on my horizon is different from what’s on partner A’s horizon. As soon as I start feeling crushy feelings, like I want to actually flirt with someone, kiss someone, or play with them, that’s on my horizon. For partner A, that’s just Tuesday. So we talk about it. But I trust my partners to make choices for themselves and for us to find ways to feel special to each other and loved without having to assign a whole buncha labels or rules to it.

This is still very weird and new to me. I didn’t always poly this way.

Similarly, I never thought I’d get to this place, but I am firmly ensconced in anarchical, non-hierarchical poly. What that means to me is that I don’t see lines between partners in terms of importance anymore. I just…love.

Yes, I have a husband. And yes, some people see that as a “primary” relationship. I tend to call it a nesting relationship, which still, in the poly community carries its own level of feeling of primariness. But I realized the other day that if I were not married now, I likely would never get married again. I mean, I can’t say for certain. But it’s not something that means the same things it meant to me when I got remarried. It doesn’t mean I want a divorce. But it means that I am feel far more autonomous than I ever expected to.

I get to choose what I do with my body and my heart. He gets to choose the same. I may not always like his or other partners’ choices in people. In fact, there was one metamour that hurt my brain. They weren’t abusive, or criminal, but they had such a different way of looking at the world that my head actually cocked to the side in confusion almost every time they came up in conversation because their actions or words made little to no sense to me. But this was NOT a situation where I thought Veto Power was appropriate.

This is especially weird and new to me. I definitely did not always poly this way.

My previous long term poly triad was built on a relationship with one person that lasted 12.5ish years (the first 2 of which were monogamous) and another that lasted the latter 10 of those 12.5ish. We practiced hierarchy and rules and labels galore. I thought this would make me safe. I thought this was how it was supposed to be. I thought this was how you poly. And when I talked with other friends, partners, and people and found there were other ways, those ways scared the shit out of me. “How can you possibly know you’re important and loved if you don’t have a ring? Or the ranking of primary? Or secondary? How do you know where you fit?”

Well. It took years, and having the primary (and in other relationships secondary) status, and the rings, and the promises of forever, and the rules, and having them all change over time to make me realize that none of it is a security blanket. None of it guarantees that you won’t grow apart. Or closer together. Or that you might find someone you want to spend a LOT of time with but, fucking hell, could never live with. Or that you want to live with but not see a whole helluva lot. Or gives the best cuddles ever but maybe you’re not that sexually compatible. Or any number of things that I couldn’t even foresee right now but that have happened. I’m also still trying to figure out how and when to use certain labels like “partner”. For me, it’s always been a dividing line between people I’m sexual with or playing with or feel romantically towards. Or some combination of all three. But reading Kimchi Cuddles a lot lately, and talking to other people who have different perspectives, maybe “partner” is more individualized than that. Still trying to figure that out.

But given all this questioning and examination, it became pretty damn clear that I had to work to find different types of security. Other ways to feel special and loved. And I had to trust my partners when they told me that they loved me and I was special to them.

(That last part take a LOT of work. I still battle not feeling good enough, or feeling disposable, or like there’s some cosmic joke and this isn’t real, or they couldn’t possibly be as into me as I am into them, or any number of THIS ENDS IN THE BAD KIND OF FIRE feelings.)

But sometimes…

Sometimes, when I finally run out of fucks to give and face all of those fears head on, I find a place of solace. Where I can go…okay. You’re pretty awesome and I care about. You say I’m pretty awesome and you care about me. I’m going to believe you. Because right now, right here, this feels good and I want to feel this good feeling and don’t wanna second guess it and torture myself with what ifs. Because what if any of them happen? Then I’ll deal. It’ll suck, but I’ll deal. But right now isn’t what if. Right now is what IS. And I prefer what is, even when it hurts or is complicated or messy. Even when it means talking incessantly about something until everyone understands. Especially then. I’ve learned so much about people and understanding in the last few days, let alone the last few years.

Somehow, I got to a place where I don’t think people complete me. But I love how we compliment each other. I don’t look for people to fill in my missing pieces. I look for adventure. And energy that goes well with mine. Sometimes, like the musical Rent says, baggage that goes well with mine because, let’s face it, that’s totally a thing. I want people in my life that help me grow and explore and discover life and I aim to be that kind of person, too.

This is how I’ve evolved in poly. I don’t have the one twue way. I know it won’t work for everyone, and that’s fine. Hell, poly doesn’t work for everyone. You do you. I’mma do me. And maybe, if our venn diagrams have the right overlap, we can do each other in some way, sometime. Or just be friends. That’s cool, too. There’s just so many different ways to relate to people and I find it endlessly fascinating. And I’m sure there will be more evolution. Not sure what that’s gonna look like, but I’m curious to find out.

On guideposts, intentions, and manifesting the life I want.

My mission, should I choose to accept it, is to find peace with exactly who and what I am. To take pride in my thoughts, my appearance, my talents, my flaws and to stop this incessant worrying that I can’t be loved as I am.
-Anais Nin

Working on my List of Intentions for 2017. This quote is going to be a guidepost for me. It doesn’t, to me, mean there isn’t room for growth and change. But it reminds me to focus my energy on positive things, like growth and change, instead of “this incessant worrying that I can’t be loved as I am”, where ever I am on that journey.

I also want to try to worry less about fitting everything and everyone into specific boxes.

Specific list coming later, but currently the List of Intentions looks a lot like cultivating more love, kink, joy, growth, spirituality, creativity, understanding, learning, reaching out to help others, purging that which no longer serves me, figuring out what does serve me, how to better serve others, exploring my ever-evolving sexuality, deepening my switchiness while honoring and exercising my submissive core, and following the positive energy.

If you’d like to join me for any part of this in 2017, message me. Let’s see what we can discover together.

“There is no vision without vulnerability.”

"Daring Greatly" by Brené Brown

“Daring Greatly” by Brené Brown

(Book review #3 – original post @ Cannonball Read 8…I’m a little behind in my blogging because of work and life, and the fact that this wasn’t as fluffy as my last book/review. But I’m still truckin’!)

I try, whenever I can, to dare greatly. I didn’t think of it this way until I started reading Brené Brown’s book “Daring Greatly: How The Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead”. She opens with a quote from Theodore Roosevelt’s speech “Citizenship in a Republic” that explains where she got the idea for the title of the book:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly…

It reminds me a lot of folk singer Harry Chapin, and how during concerts he used to talk about how his grandfather explained that there are two different types of tired…good tired and bad tired:

“Ironically enough, bad tired can be a day that you won. But you won other people’s battles, you lived other people’s days, other people’s agendas, other people’s dreams. And when it’s all over, there was very little you in there. And when you hit the hay at night, somehow you toss and turn; you don’t settle easy. It’s that good tired, ironically enough, can be a day that you lost, but you don’t even have to tell yourself because you knew you fought your battles, you chased your dreams, you lived your days and when you hit the hay at night, you settle easy, you sleep the sleep of the just and you say ‘take me away’”.

This book made me good tired. It took me far longer than I expected to read, as I borrowed it from a good friend about a year and a half ago. Thing is, this isn’t one of those books you tear through. It’s not a thrilling mystery that you want to race to finish so you know whodunnit. It’s not a sweeping romance that you devour until the inevitable end when they go all meatcutie and finally fuck at last. And it’s not an easy, breezy beach read that spirits you away somewhere for a few hours. It’s intense.

You know you’re in for a soul-searching ride when a book tells you it’s going to explore the following questions on page 2-3:

  • What drives our fear of being vulnerable?
  • How are we protecting ourselves from vulnerability?
  • What prices are we paying when we shut down and disengage?
  • How do we own and engage with vulnerability so we can start transforming the way we live, love, parent, and lead?

From there, we dive right into answering those questions, delving into narcissism, feeling not good enough or just plain “enough”, and how detrimental using shame, comparison, and disengagement are to daring greatly and ultimately growing.

These are things that hit home rather hard to me, especially lately, as I’ve been having issues with feeling insecure in a burgeoning relationship and have been falling into the comparison trap quite a bit, which has been leading to some self-shaming and disengagement. The plus side is because of this book and years of practice and reading about polyamory, I know what’s happening and am able to mostly correct it. Well, mostly with help.

I’m working hard on becoming more “wholehearted”, as the author talks about:

The opposite of scarcity is enough, or what I call Wholeheartedness…there are many tenets of Wholeheartedness, but at its very core is vulnerability and worthiness: facing uncertainty, exposure, and emotional risks, and knowing I am enough.

Which all makes sense but is hard as HELL to really adapt into your life and feel on a regular basis. And this is only page 29, y’all. It gets heavier and harder from there. She goes into gender stereotypes and how each of the genders is fucked in it’s own special way with the thoroughly screwed up messages we give people, debunks vulnerability myths, teaches us how to understand and combat shame, how to build a “vulnerability armory”. As if that wasn’t enough, she then launches into how to put all these lessons into practice in the workplace, in education, and in your own families.

This is not a book that you can just gobble up, put down, and forget about. It’s helping me be a better boss, a better partner to the people I’m in relationships with or could be, a better friend, and a better person overall, I think. Brené has a way of making you feel not so alone, as she includes a healthy dose of personal anecdotes to drive her points home. She is not perfect and freely admits it, but she continually strives to improve and become more wholehearted and that’s my goal, too.